Sunday, October 11, 2015

More prep


My first video. I filmed a bit during a 1-day training course I attended 1 week ago.
Read below for more info.

Hi guys,

It's been a while since the first post. I think a lot has happened since and I'd like to share some of it here.

Website

So the "website" (thats really a blog) has seen a lot of updates over the past 2 weeks. I have had a hard time having an overall picture of what information to put there and how to present it. There is a lot I wanna share, I just seem can't find a place to start.

But one of the sections that has had a major overhaul is the "Route"-section. I have draw a lot of inspiration from the Globebuster's website, but have found it a very nice way of presenting my route. Even my self have had problem trying to grasp the vastness of it, but dividing it into stages and then further into weeks have helped a lot. Before when I get a question like "When will you be in ...?", I couldn't even guess at a date. But having split it into these stages makes things a lot easier for me to wrap my head around.

Also, under each week description I have made a small statistics area and a link to Google Maps with the particular peace of the route. What to notice there is especially the "drive index" which is a description of what distance to cover on average per day. So having only 180 km/d in average is a pretty easy schedule to keep, but when that index rises to 377 km/d (as in the case of the Mexico-part) it means there is a whole lot of driving going on with very little rest or chances for filming, photographing etc.

So far, I have planned the route from Argentina to Alaska and then back down to California. So according to my original plan, I also wanted to cross USA from California to New York - however, that part I did not plan yet. Cuz in the process of actually mapping out the first south-to-north part made me realise it is a huge undertaking. So there is very well a chance that 1) I'm fed up of riding a motorcycle by the time I reach Alaska, 2) I can't keep up with my schedule or I stop somewhere for a long time, 3) that I might be unable to finish the trip or 4) some unforeseen situation arrises.
Therefore I haven't bothered to finish the planing for the across-USA part. Also, I am constantly reminding myself that there should be room for improvisation and deviating from the route - a very important rule on the trip has to be "Be impulsive". (Maybe I should make a section on the blog that lists a bunch of rules???)

Promotion

So a part of my project is also to promote it. By promotion I mean just telling people about it. By now, I don't think there is a friend or colleague that doesn't know about the trip. It is not like I'm trying to sell anything, but there more people who knows about the project, there more interesting I can make it look and make new people interested, the more I can get out of it in terms of advice and help from the same people. Smart, right?

First edition of the business cards
Part of my idea for a fast way to present this to people is by something used everyday by business people. The business card.
It is such a simple yet effective way of handing over information to other people and give them your contact info. So I wanted to make some business cards to bring where-ever I go and give to whom seem to be interested in the project when I tell them. Especially while ON the trip, I could give it to people that I meet so that they can tune back in and see the progress.

This is just the first test of the business cards, but it was printed professionally on very nice, thick and heavy paper - so it looks awesome in your hand. However, if I find a way to make it better, I will for the next print-up. But I'm actually quite happy about the way these turned out. Let me know what you think in your comments.

Off-road training

Taking the bike off-road is fun!
A week ago, I had signed up for a 1-day course arranged by the local BMW dealer. The purpose of the course is to teach you the way to drive your motorcycle outside the asphalt - where the road ends. If you spend a lot of money on a bike like mine, why not spend a few more to learn how to ride it?

During the day I learned how to manoeuvre the bike in very confined space, balance it through soft sand and water and much more. It's a lot to put into one day, but it made me a lot more confident in the terrain. And for this of you who claim different - the big BMW R1200GSA is very capable in the terrain if you know how to use it. I said it before and I'll say it again, it is a very impressive piece of machinery.

Me with my diploma
During the day, I filmed a little bit. I took me a while, but I finally cut it to a nice little 4 min. video that you see in the top of the post.

I better stop now - this post is already getting to be way to long to be interesting. But before I go, I can tell then I'm heading to Germany tomorrow (on the bike) because I signed up for another course - this time given by BMW in Hechlingen Endure Park in Germany. I will also try taking video from there and compile for the next post - it is good training for my video editing skills. The first many videos are gonna be crude but will hopefully improve over time and be top tuned for the start of the trip.

See ya next time!